• Language: English
  • ISSN: 15967751
  • Established Year: 2010
  • Published Articles: 31
Journal of Nigerian Environmental Society (JNES)

Executive Editor:Prof. T. K. S. Abam
ISSN:15967751
Publication Frequency:Annually
Publisher:Nigerian Environmental Society
Paper Submission E-mail:

The Journal of Nigerian Environmental Society is an open access journal that provides rapid publication (quarterly) of articles in all areas of Environmental issues, such as Environmental Microbiology and Public Health, Ecology, Applied Sciences, Geology, Socio-economics, Legislative and Engineering principles and Environmental management. Environmental Biotechnology, Genetics, Biodiversity and Toxicology are also covered. The Journal welcomes the submission of manuscripts that meet the general criteria of significance and scientific excellence. Papers will be published shortly after acceptance. All articles are peer-reviewed.

JOURNAL OF NIGERIAN ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIETY (JNES)

www.jnes-nes.org/JNES

Instructions for Authors

The Journal of Nigerian Environmental Society (ISSN 1596-7751) is an open access journal that provides rapid publication (quarterly) of articles in all areas of Environmental issues, such as Environmental Microbiology and Public Health, Ecology, Applied Sciences, Geology, Socio-economics, Legislative and Engineering principles and Environmental management. Environmental Biotechnology, Genetics, Biodiversity and Toxicology are also covered. The Journal welcomes the submission of manuscripts that meet the general criteria of significance and scientific excellence. Papers will be published shortly after acceptance. All articles are peer-reviewed.

Submit manuscripts to the Editor In-Chief (JNES), Prof. Confidence K. Wachukwu, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Rivers State University, Nkpolu-Oroworukwo, Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

 E-mail: wachukwuck@yahoo.com or wachukwu.confidence@ust.edu.ng

Article Types

Three types of manuscripts may be submitted:

Regular articles: These should describe new and carefully confirmed findings, and experimental procedures should be given in sufficient detail for others to verify the work. The length of a full paper should be the minimum required to describe and interpret the work clearly.

Short Communications: A Short Communication is suitable for recording the results of complete small investigations or giving details of new models or innovative methods or techniques. The style of main sections need not conform to that of full-length papers. Short communications are 2 to 4 printed pages (about 6 to 12 manuscript pages) in length.

Reviews: Submissions of reviews and perspectives covering topics of current interest are welcome and encouraged. Reviews should be concise and no longer than 4-6 printed pages (about 12 to 18 manuscript pages). Reviews manuscripts are also peer-reviewed.

Review Process

All manuscripts are reviewed by an editor and members of the Editorial Board or qualified outside reviewers. Authors cannot nominate reviewers. Only reviewers randomly selected from our database with specialization in the subject area will be contacted to evaluate the manuscripts. The process will be blind review.

Decisions will be made as rapidly as possible, and the journal strives to return reviewers’ comments to authors as soon as possible. The editorial board will re-review manuscripts that are accepted pending revision. It is the goal of the JNES to publish manuscripts shortly after submission.

Regular articles Information

All portions of the manuscript must be typed double-spaced and all pages numbered starting from the title page.

The Title should be a brief phrase describing the contents of the paper. The Title Page should include the authors' full names and affiliations, the name of the corresponding author along with phone, fax and E-mail information. Present addresses of authors should appear as a footnote.

The Abstract should be informative and completely self-explanatory, briefly present the topic, state the scope of the experiments, indicate significant data, and point out major findings and conclusions. The Abstract should be100 to 300 words in length. Complete sentences, active verbs, and the third person should be used, and the abstract should be written in the past tense. Standard nomenclature should be used and abbreviations should be avoided. No literature should be cited.

Following the abstract, about 3 to 10 key words that will provide indexing references to should be listed.

The Introduction should provide a clear statement of the problem, the relevant literature on the subject, and the proposed approach or solution. It should be understandable to colleagues from a broad range of scientific disciplines.

Materials and methods should be complete enough to allow experiments to be reproduced. However, only truly new procedures should be described in detail; previously published procedures should be cited, and important modifications of published procedures should be mentioned briefly. Capitalize trade names and include the manufacturer's name and address. Subheadings should be used. Methods in general use need not be described in detail.                           

Results should be presented with clarity and precision. The results should be written in the past tense when describing findings in the authors' experiments. Previously published findings should be written in the present tense. Results should be explained, but largely without referring to the literature. Discussion, speculation and detailed interpretation of data should not be included in the Results but should be put into the Discussion section.

The Discussion should interpret the findings in view of the results obtained in this and in past studies on this topic. State the conclusions in a few sentences at the end of the paper. The Results and Discussion sections can include subheadings, and when appropriate, both sections can be combined.

The Acknowledgments of people, grants or funds should be brief.

Tables should be kept to a minimum and be designed to be as simple as possible. Tables are to be typed double-spaced throughout, including headings and footnotes. Each table should be on a separate page, numbered consecutively in Arabic numerals and supplied with a heading and a legend. Tables should be self-explanatory without reference to the text. The details of the methods used in the experiments should preferably be described in the legend instead of in the text. The same data should not be presented in both table and graph form or repeated in the text. Again, all horizontal and vertical lines should be removed.

Figure legends should be typed in numerical order on a separate sheet. Graphics should be prepared using applications capable of generating high resolution GIF, TIFF, JPEG or PowerPoint before pasting in the Microsoft Word manuscript file. Tables should be prepared in Microsoft Word. Use Arabic numerals to designate figures and upper case letters for their parts (Figure 1). Begin each legend with a title and include sufficient description so that the figure is understandable without reading the text of the manuscript. Information given in legends should not be repeated in the text.

References: In the text, a reference identified by means of an author‘s name should be followed by the date of the reference in parentheses. When there are more than two authors, only the first author‘s name should be mentioned, followed by ’et al‘. In the event that an author cited has had two or more works published during the same year, the reference, both in the text and in the reference list, should be identified by a lower case letter like ’a‘ and ’b‘ after the date to distinguish the works. Follow the American Psychological Association (APA) referencing style.

References should be listed at the end of the paper in alphabetical order. Articles in preparation or articles submitted for publication, unpublished observations, personal communications, etc. should not be included in the reference list.

Examples: Journals.

Ede, P. N., & Edokpa, D. O. (2017). Emission dispersion simulated for a crude oil tank farm explosion in the Niger Delta of Nigeria. Journal of Nigerian                Environmental Society, 11(1), 1-12. 

Wachukwu, C. K.,  Amala, S. E., & Okwakpam, C. (2010).  Health risks           associated        with tyre smoke on meat roasters in abattoirs in Port           Harcourt, Nigeria.  Journal of Nigerian Environmental Society, 5(4), 18-     28.

Williams, J. H. (2008). Employee engagement: Improving participation in         safety. Professional Safety, 53(12), 40-45.

Books:

Alexie, S. (1992). The business of fancy dancing: Stories and poems. Brooklyn,      NY: Hang Loose Press.

Prof. T. K. S. Abam
Editor-in-Chief
Prof. Israel O. Owate
Member
Prof. L. I. Ezemonye
Member
Prof. M. J. Ayotamuno
Member
Prof. Mrs. O. B. Owei
Member
Dr. Isinguzo, Nnadozie Sunday
Member
Prof. T. G. Sokari
Member
Prof. I. K. E. Ekweozor
Member
Prof. C. K. Wachukwu
Member
Dr. P. N. Ede
Member
Dr. S. A. Ngah
Member