Publisher: Lead City University

External Intervention and Asymmetric Warfare In Africa: The Case of Nigeria

Bakare, Adebola Rafiu
KEYWORDS: Terrorism, military offensive, Islamism, non-military intervention, insurgency.

ABSTRACT:

The President Jonathan’s address at the 68th United Nations General Assembly in New York (September 24, 2013) may probably mark a turning point in external military intervention in countries under terrorist attack. He opined that attack by any terrorist group on civilian (asymmetric warfare) anywhere in the world is an assault on collective humanity and all countries must intervene regardless of where it happens; for the international community to win the global war on terror. It is on this note that this paper examines the implication which Nigeria’s external intervention will have on its national security under two repercussive views: the ongoing internal Boko Haram insurgency and the newest wave of retaliatory vengeance attack by the terrorists on the intervening third-party as recently witnessed in the Al-Shabab Kenyan Westgate Mall attack. The paper raised concern on a number of security lapses ranging from porous border, undocumented influx of foreign nationals, lack of intelligence information sharing among security institutions and inappropriate response to intelligence report among others which might gravely affect the nation. The paper strongly supports the idea of external intervention on the scale of existing peacekeeping operations but with the stringent condition that all identified security lapses are taken care of, before dabbling into such venture. It concluded that Nigeria should engage in the exercise to bring peace to the continent of Africa in particular and the world order in general; and justify her ‘most suitable’ campaign for the UN Security Council permaneThe President Jonathan’s address at the 68th United Nations General Assembly in New York (September 24, 2013) may probably mark a turning point in external military intervention in countries under terrorist attack. He opined that attack by any terrorist group on civilian (asymmetric warfare) anywhere in the world is an assault on collective humanity and all countries must intervene regardless of where it happens; for the international community to win the global war on terror. It is on this note that this paper examines the implication which Nigeria’s external intervention will have on its national security under two repercussive views: the ongoing internal Boko Haram insurgency and the newest wave of retaliatory vengeance attack by the terrorists on the intervening third-party as recently witnessed in the Al-Shabab Kenyan Westgate Mall attack. The paper raised concern on a number of security lapses ranging from porous border, undocumented influx of foreign nationals, lack of intelligence information sharing among security institutions and inappropriate response to intelligence report among others which might gravely affect the nation. The paper strongly supports the idea of external intervention on the scale of existing peacekeeping operations but with the stringent condition that all identified security lapses are taken care of, before dabbling into such venture. It concluded that Nigeria should engage in the exercise to bring peace to the continent of Africa in particular and the world order in general; and justify her ‘most suitable’ campaign for the UN Security Council permanent seat.‚Äč


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